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Is Constantly Horny
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Just thought I would write up a review of the T16 engine, based on the experience I have had so far.

The first thing I could like to say is how good it is on fuel I am currently getting 350+ miles to a tank, very very good when you consider it’s a 2.1 ltr turbo with larger turbo intercooler etc.

Starting it in the cold morning take no more than 4 secs it turns over and then springs into life and considering I have a as new engine its considerably quite. Ounce the engine is warm it starts just as well as a new car.

The torque on this engine is unreal it gets from 0-70 in what seems like a blink of an eye and that’s with the boost set to 6psi and not taking it over 4k.

It idles quite high at first but as soon as its warm it sits at just under 1k, however the idling will jump up to around 1.5k every now and then, its just one of the T-series small glitches.

The weight difference compared to the k is not really that noticeable, what is though is how modern the engine feels, the steering is a lot more responsive its tighter and it is just overall a much nicer drive, the steady torque through all the rev range makes driving seem effortless.

Touch wood It will give me years of good reliable fun :D
 

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Sounds well good,. i wana do it to my zr would it be possible to give me a list on everything i need to do it,

cheers Dom.
 

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Thats not entirely correct about the idling jumping up to 1500 rpm every so often. On both standard and highly tuned t16's, I've never had mine jump up that far so I think it's wrong to say that is a glitch of the t16. I'd say more to do with either your ECU map or throttle body. Nice to hear you are enjoying your new build.
 

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A rover 220 turbo, 420/620 turbo or 820 vitesse, with engine/loom/gearbox/driveshafts/ancillaries etc.
Although all T16 engines there are diffrences.

The 220/420 are the same as each other.
The 820 has a much deeper sump and the water pump outlet points down.
The 620 has a different sump and isn't interchangable with the others.
I managed to hole my 820 sump on my maestro just under heavy braking.

You also need to watch out for A/C, do you have aircon.
 

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How are you getting 350 miles on a tank, I manage 200 in my maestro, if I'm lucky.
 

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Thats a good review Matt.
I agree with everything except for the weight thing. I think the T-series kinda wrecks the handling a bit. Its a very heavy engine due to the cast iron block and i find it tends to send the car sliding straight on when cornering in the wet. Can be scary! :D
I agree with the fuel as well, i can get 350+ miles if i watch my right foot. It can be pretty economical if driven sensibly.

Glad your enjoying it and it WILL give you years of reliable fun ;)

The 620 has a different sump and isn't interchangable with the others.
You can use the 620ti alloy sump on the other engines :yes:
My 820 Vitesse engine has a 620ti sump on as the 820 sump was too low. It also meant i could run it without an oil cooler ;)
 

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i too cant really feel a massive weight difference, but then i dont tend to throw the car into corners when its raining...

seriously though, come back to us with the fuel economy once the boost is up and you can really give it some. at the minute im getting 200 to a tank usually, but i do crappy 2 mile stop/starts to work. but even economically driving im still only looking at 230-250.

gota say i also havent had any idle jumping problems, and how come its taking so long to crank over in a morning, is this a characteristic of freshly built engines, as mine cracks up within a second or so usually? what size battery you running it on?
 

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with it being a new engine the rings won't be fully bedded in so will have to build up compression, will get faster once the engine is run in more :)
 

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Thats a good review Matt.
I agree with everything except for the weight thing. I think the T-series kinda wrecks the handling a bit. Its a very heavy engine due to the cast iron block and i find it tends to send the car sliding straight on when cornering in the wet. Can be scary! :D
I agree with the fuel as well, i can get 350+ miles if i watch my right foot. It can be pretty economical if driven sensibly.

Glad your enjoying it and it WILL give you years of reliable fun ;)



You can use the 620ti alloy sump on the other engines :yes:
My 820 Vitesse engine has a 620ti sump on as the 820 sump was too low. It also meant i could run it without an oil cooler ;)
Weight isn't an issue in the maestro as they use virtually the same block but only with 8v.

Maybe one has to modify the 620ti sump or one can't fit the steel sump on the 620ti block, I can't remember exactly but there are differences.

The 820 doesn't run an oil cooler, it is only the 220 and 420 that do IIRC.
 

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with it being a new engine the rings won't be fully bedded in so will have to build up compression, will get faster once the engine is run in more :)
If it is running DTA which I suspect it is then then it takes a few engine turns before ECU synchronises with the flywheel. It just takes longer without mems for some reason, regardless of what ECU is used.
 

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Weight isn't an issue in the maestro as they use virtually the same block but only with 8v.

Maybe one has to modify the 620ti sump or one can't fit the steel sump on the 620ti block, I can't remember exactly but there are differences.

The 820 doesn't run an oil cooler, it is only the 220 and 420 that do IIRC.
The Ti bottom end with the alloy sump uses M8 boltswhich are quite long and the 220/420 bottom end uses a tin sump and shorter M6 bolts. To use the alloy sump on the 220/420 you either need to drill and tap the bottom end to use M8 bolts, or use longer M6 bolts.

Also need to use the 220/420 cam side engine mount and PAS pump in place of the Ti one (at least in an R8 conversion).
 
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the ally sump does need longer bolts as i have one on my 220 tubby block with the oil cooler.. no modding is required to fit them.:cap:
 

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Maybe one has to modify the 620ti sump or one can't fit the steel sump on the 620ti block, I can't remember exactly but there are differences.
The Ti bottom end with the alloy sump uses M8 boltswhich are quite long and the 220/420 bottom end uses a tin sump and shorter M6 bolts. To use the alloy sump on the 220/420 you either need to drill and tap the bottom end to use M8 bolts, or use longer M6 bolts
the ally sump does need longer bolts as i have one on my 220 tubby block with the oil cooler.. no modding is required to fit them.:cap:
Yeah, you need to bugger about with the bolt holes to fit a 620ti alloy sump to a 220 or 420 block, but the 820 engine uses the same M8 bolts as the Ti. Mine is a vitesse engine so i was able to fit the alloy sump without any work needing done :)

The 820 doesn't run an oil cooler, it is only the 220 and 420 that do IIRC.
No, your perfectly correct, i was just meaning that due to the standard 820 sump on my engine being too low, i was able to just swap to a Ti alloy one instead of hunting around to get a 220 sump and plumb in an oil cooler :)
Im just lazy and take the easy way out ;)
 

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Rather than all of that I just fitted a 220 sump on my 820 lump (with a montego pick up) and then run a rather oversized coolant rad which keeps the general engine temp down.

I am fitting an oil temp gauge at some point so I'll see what temp the oil runs at.
 

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I Like To Disco Dance
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got to agree with youngy on the weight thing, i only had avo springs and i was constantly reminded of the extra weight up front.

Its an amazing feeling when it really goes though, Glad you finally got it done mate
 
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